women artists

Angelica Kauffman Sculpture (collaboration with Bob and Roberta Smith)

Angelica Kauffman Sculpture (collaboration with Bob and Roberta Smith) was made as part of THE SECRET TO A GOOD LIFE exhibition, The Ronald and Rita McAulay Gallery, Burlington Gardens, Royal Academy of Arts (held 4 Sept 2018 – 3 Feb 2019)

This special project by Bob and Roberta Smith RA explores the story of women artists and the Royal Academy – through the lens of his own family history. Bob and Roberta Smith’s mother, the artist Deirdre Borlase, regularly exhibited in the RA’s Summer Exhibition. She thought she was more likely to be selected if she submitted works without her first name, to avoid giving away her gender. Members of Borlase’s family explore her story, and some of the other – sometimes strained – relationships between women and the Royal Academy over its history.

Three new sculptures include This is Deirdre Borlase ARCA, 2018, by Bob and Roberta Smith RA and sculptures of the Academy’s female founders, Mary Moser RA and Angelica Kauffman RA, created by Smith in collaboration with his wife, Jessica Voorsanger, and their daughter, Etta Voorsanger-Brill.

The sculpture of Angelica Kauffman, a collaboration with Jessica Voorsanger is covered in 15 portraits of women artists she is inspired by starting with Angelica Kauffman (as the head) to Mona Hatoum and Alice Neel amongst others.

Portraits     

The portraits of women artists on the collaborative sculpture are: Laurie Anderson, Sofonisba Anguissola, Sonia Boyce, Claude Cahun, Mona Hatoum, Frida Kahlo, Angelica Kauffman, Lee Krasner, Yayoi Kusama, Edmonia Lewis, Ana Mandieta, Alice Neel, Georgia O’Keefe, Lorna Simpson and Kara Walker.

               

Publication
The accompanying book Bob and Roberta Smith: The Secret to a Good Life explores the role of women artists, the sexism of the art world and the benefits of drawing every day. Find out more.

 

Panel Discussion @Jerwood Gallery Hastings June 3, 2017

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Overlap – relationships, reputation and legacy of women artists

Saturday June 3, 2017 (11.30-12.30pm), Studio, Jerwood Hastings

Curators Day+Gluckman, authors of A Woman’s Place Project, will be in conversation with artist Jessica Voorsanger and Tate curator and art historian Carol Jacobi to discuss the complex relationship of a woman artist to her personal biography and relationships.  As two Jerwood exhibitions of women artists overlap, that of Jean Cooke and Eileen Agar, the panel will have an honest and frank conversation about the legacy of women artists and how their art is often overlooked in favour of their relationships to male artists.

Jessica Voorsanger’s art practice looks at the construct of self, often through humorous installations or performances to unpick popular and celebrity culture. Voorsanger has exhibited extensively internationally, and she also happens to be married to Patrick Brill (AKA the artist Bob+Roberta Smith).

Carol Jacobi is Curator, British Art 1850–1915 at Tate.  Her research is centred on nineteenth- and twentieth-century British painting, sculpture and photography. She has backgrounds in science and literature, preferring an interdisciplinary approach, and has a long term commitment to challenging the canon and looking at the legacy of overlooked women artists.

A Woman’s Place is a contemporary arts, heritage and education project where female equality provides the contextual backbone. A two year programme rolls out across the South East in 2017.  The project is funded by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, The National Trust and South East partners.  Other events across SE venues can be found at www.dayandgluckman.co.uk and significant new commissions at Knole House (National Trust), Sevenoaks, Kent in 2018.£10 (£8 for Jerwood Gallery Members)

For further information and to book tickets please click here
Image: Jessica Voorsanger, Claude Monet, from The Bald Series, 2013 by Jessica Voorsanger at Liberties exhibition 2016

Copyright © 2017 Day + Gluckman, All rights reserved.